A Feather In My Cap

Life appears now to be so much like one of those mathematical theorems I learnt during college; everything happens because of something else and everything leads to something else. There seems to be a definite purpose, some kind of logic, running through all the random, unrelated incidents.

Take this certificate as an example.

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I received it after online submission of a poem ‘Celebration Of Love’ on Facebook on 28 April 2016. This poem  was inspired from a photo I clicked much earlier.

URL of poem and photo: http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/bird-logic/

But when I clicked that pic in the first place, it was just any other pic. I had no idea what I was going to do with it and where it would take me to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Culinary Experiment No.2 – Dalia Tikki

About 5 years ago, I bought a packet of pre-roasted dalia (coarsely ground wheat) and made porridge with it. My family didn’t like it at all and the idea of making some other dalia dish, such as dalia khichdi, didn’t seem to be worth it. So the jarful of dalia remained un-utilized and its presence kept on tormenting me. Being a home-maker, I hate to see food items getting wasted. Every grain, after all, takes a lot of resources and efforts to create.

Yesterday, I checked this jar and to my utter amazement, I found the Dalia as fresh as it was 5 years ago! An idea then took shape in my mind. Inspired by my recent experiment with Murmure, I decided to make Dalia tikkis. As I had expected, they were a great hit! I had some pudina chutney in my fridge, which I had made the previous day. The two together made great company.

The best part of it, as far as I was concerned, was that I could turn an unused food item to something of great value. My jar of Dalia is empty now and I feel as though a great burden has been lifted off my shoulders.

Here are the step-by-step pics.

Step 1: Grind roasted dalia in the mixie and mix this powder with the boiled potatoes.

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Step 2: Add spices (salt, chilli powder, amchur, ginger-garlic paste), cut green chillies, green coriander leaves, chopped onion) and mix into a dough.

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Step 3: The dough is ready now.

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Step4: Take out balls from this dough and turn them into tikkis.

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Step 5: Deep fry the tikkis as I did. But if you wish, you may shallow-fry them on a non-stick pan.

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Step 6: Keep turning them over till they turn golden-brown on all sides and take them out.

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Step 7: Place the tikkis on tissue paper to drain out excess oil. Serve them with green chutney or any other dip of your choice.

 

 

Love On The Rails

Love is on the rails these days and hugging and kissing in the open is no longer a taboo here…Take a look at this pic clicked at a Delhi Metro Station and you will understand what I mean; a sign of changing times, of liberalization, of glasnost…I wonder how the Khap Panchayats react when they look at such images. Probably like a bull who sees red, with a lot of angry gnashing of teeth, I am sure!

 

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Gurdwara Bangla Sahib – New Delhi

We visited Bangla Sahib Gurudwara located in Central Delhi for the umpteenth time on Sunday, 24 April 2016. We clicked lots of photos this time and we were amazed to find it looking so breathtakingly beautiful in the backdrop of the setting sun in spite of the crowd milling around. Before I paste some of these pics, I feel I must tell you a little bit about its history.

Gurdwara Bangla Sahib was originally a bungalow belonging to Raja Jai Singh, an Indian ruler in the seventeenth century, and was known as Jaisinghpura Palace, in Jaisingh Pura, a historic neighbourhood demolished to make way for Connaught Place. The eighth Sikh Guru, Guru Har Krishan resided here during his stay in Delhi in 1664. During that time, there was an epidemic of  smallpox and cholera and Guru Har Krishan helped the suffering by giving aid and fresh water from the well at this house. Soon he too contracted the illness and eventually died on March 30, 1664. A small tank was later constructed by Raja Jai Singh over the well; the same tank is now a little pool (sarovar) and its water is now revered as having healing properties and is taken by Sikhs throughout the world back to their homes.

Gurdwara Bangla Sahib was first built as a small temple by Sikh General Sardar Bhagel Singh in 1783, who supervised the construction of nine Sikh shrines in Delhi in the same year, during the reign of Mughal Emperor, Shal Alam II. The Gurdwara and its Sarovar are now a place of great reverence for Sikhs and a place for special congregation on the birth anniversary of Guru Har Krishan.

Once this place became a full-fledged place of worship, the name Jai Singh was given to the road leading to this place. Jai Singh Road now has several buildings including YMCA and the Oxford Library.

This proves that we mortals are nothing against the all-powerful Time and even after death, we can be pulled down from our palaces and made to stand humbly on dusty roads…

Photos Courtesy: Sukhangshu Chatterjee & Jasbir Chatterjee

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Here we are, man and wife, outside the Gurdwara, enjoying our time together…

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Proposed site for Museum of Sikh Studies…

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A duck lost in contemplation…

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Glory of the setting sun…

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Colorful fishes swim in the sarovar…

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The following pics were clicked on our way out from the back gate…

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BCP – A Photographer’s Delight

I look forward to my official visits these days to BCP (Bhikaji Cama Place), New Delhi, adjoining Safdarjung Enclave – because it gives me the chance to indulge myself in my latest passion, photography.

If you look around here with the eyes of a nature lover, you will find an interesting angle in every corner  with a rich, sensuous appeal because of the lush greenery surrounding it and the pink and creamish-yellow colour of the buildings. During spring, this place gets embellished further with the blossoms of Semal and Bougainvillea flowers.

Delhi has many other commercial complexes, e.g., Rajendra Place, Nehru Place, Ranjit Nagar, just to name a few. The one at Rajendra Place has a little lake too. But I find none of them as pretty as BCP.

BCP is, in fact, a photographer’s delight and not many are even aware of it! It could be because office-goers are generally engrossed with so many other things,  office politics, work targets, career problems, job security, family issues, etc, etc. Like me when I was younger.

Out of curiosity, I recently looked up the history of BCP in Google. This was what I found.     1. It was built by the DDA (Delhi Development Authority) in the 80s over an area of 35 acres.                                                                                                                                                                    2. A recent survey done by Svayam –  National Centre for Inclusive Environments had this to say , “Today the complex has become a symbol of utter disdain for public property and lack of maintenance and is in shambles. Though it stands in the heart of South Delhi, the complex today exposes the apathy of the administration.”

I found the survey findings very shocking and disappointing!

Anyway, let’s keep aside the survey and walk together through these pics. They are just 2 months old. Do they match with Svayam’s description?

 

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I Beg to Differ

We are all victims of our circumstances. But not everyone understands this. That’s why when people think and act differently, they end up being ridiculed and persecuted. People become different because Nature subjects them to extraordinary challenges and forces them to be what they are. We are all God’s children.Let’s allow everyone to breathe freely.

Take a look at these aberrations and tell me what you think.

  1. Tree growing from a house.
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2. Show-stopper at a bus-stop, playing strange antics.

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3. The small video below is of an apparently psychiatric case. This man doesn’t speak to anyone and is usually found near temples. He doesn’t stay still and rotates twice after every 3 steps. From his clothes, he seems to be from a nice family who takes good care of him.

 

4.  The LGBTQ community.

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