Bharat Mata Ki Jai Ho!

Bharat Mata Ki Jai Ho! I will not say anything else. Let the pic speak for itself.

 

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Birth of a Leader

No one is a born leader. People become leaders only after passing through fire day in and day out and unceasingly hearing the whispers of their hardened stems, angry rumbles of their ever-thirsty roots, and painful sighs of the fallen ones.

Like this young Adenium flower bud. See how confidently it raises its head against all odds, far away from its merry siblings on the top….

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Culinary Experiments

Starting point…

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This week I tried out something new in the kitchen. It was a great success and  filled me with immense joy and satisfaction. Before you jump to conclusions, let me make it clear that I am not a cooking expert and my knowledge of cooking has more to do with experience than any real interest. I cook because I have to and cooking day in and day out as a daily routine is such a mundane affair, isn’t it?

Appreciation from my family did, of course, contribute to my happiness. But more important to me was the fact that I managed to save a food item from being wasted and turn it into something that everyone found tasty. Isn’t that such a wonderful thing and environment-friendly too?

Alright, let me clear up the suspense. I am talking about the trivial, lowly murmure that gets left over from pujas at home or when we bring it home as Prasad after visiting big temples. Most of it catches fungus in the end and that’s when it is discarded. To avoid this situation, I started giving it all to my maid servant. But every time I did so, the expression on her face indicated that she did not feel very obliged. It was obvious that even she did not know what to do with it and probably just threw it away into the garbage.

What I made was the aloo tikki with a difference. Instead of using bread as the binding agent, I used the left-over murmure. First, I dried the murmure in the microwave oven and let it cool outside for about 15 minutes. Once they became crisp, I ground them in the mixie. I then mixed this powder with the boiled and peeled potatoes and rest of the procedure was as usual for tikkis, that is, adding all those ingredients (salt, chilli powder, ginger-garlic paste, sliced onion, green coriander, jeera powder, dhania powder, garam masala powder, and amchur) and kneading the whole stuff into tight dough. From this dough, I took out average sized balls which I rolled into tikkis.

Next step was the frying part. I used the deep frying method as it’s faster. I read somewhere that deep frying isn’t as bad as it’s made out to be vis-a-vis shallow frying. But you don’t necessarily have to accept this; it’s a democratic, free country, thank God; shallow fry your tikkis on a non-stick tawa, if that’s how you like them…

Here are the lovely tikkis, shedding their excess oil on tissue paper.

The End-products

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I would also like to add that 2 days ago, my husband brought home a fresh stock of murmure, some dry fruit, batashe, and mishri from his visit to Vaishno Devi. I mixed up some of this stuff into a bowl and had it distributed as Prasad in my office. My latest best friend in my office, a new joinee, loved it so much that she asked me to bring all the remaining once again to office especially for her. And she loved the tikkis too.

Well, that’s how I finished up my murmure this time, spreading joy and happiness all the way through…

6 April 2016

 

 

 

The Significance of being ‘Kaur’

I discovered a very interesting poem today, ‘Who is Kaur.’ The author is Randhir Kaur. I never knew until now the huge significance behind the title ‘Kaur.’ The link is given below.

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/who-is-kaur/

My poems are here: http://www.poemhunter.com/jasbir-chatterjee/