Category Archives: people

Jimikand Stew

Jimikand (Elephant Yam) is an ugly duckling among vegetables.

Pure vegetarians don’t like it much because of its meaty flavor while pure non-vegetarians don’t like to waste their time and energies on something that masquerades at being what it isn’t.

And those who love it don’t eat it very often either. In my complete life of 5 decades so far, I remember having eaten it only 4 times; first time as a child when Mom made it. Second time was when an office colleague brought it for lunch. I ate it with great relish on both the occasions. Third time, I tried to make it myself. It was during the Google-free era when recipes were not always readily available. Though I put in my best possible efforts, it turned out to be awful! I thought I would never cook it again.

But, as destiny would have it, in around October 2018, my husband bought some jimikand along with other vegetables at a local grocery store. It was because of one of their special offers. For several days, the jimikand sat in our fridge. Finally, when all the other veggies were over, I decided to make one more attempt at cooking it. I gathered a lot of ideas from Google.

To my great surprise, the dish turned out to be very tasty and it was made in a jiffy.

My husband said, “It tasted somewhat like the way my Mom used to make it.” I took that as a big complement as my mother-in-law was a highly-accomplished cook.

It gives me a lot of joy today as I share the recipe with you all in this post.

Process

1. Wear gloves while peeling jimikand as it causes itching on bare skin.

2. Soak the cut pieces in water and squeeze some lemon juice into it. Keep the vessel aside for about 15 minutes.

3. Take out the cut jimikand pieces and wash them well in water. Deep fry them in batches in a pressure cooker till they turn brown. Take them out out of oil once done.

4. Take out excess oil and leave just about two tablespoons of oil in the pressure cooker. Turn on the gas again. Put a half teaspoonful of whole cumin into the hot oil. Once they start crackling, add chopped onion. After they start turning pink, add chopped tomato. When the oil starts appearing on the sides, add the spices as per your taste (turmeric, chilli powder, coriander powder, jeera powder, etc). Stir a little bit. Then add the fried jimikand pieces followed by salt according to taste.

5. Add water as per required viscosity and some green coriander leaves.

6. When the water starts boiling, cover with the lid and place the whistle. After about 4 or 5 whistles, the jimikand stew would be ready.

7. Open the cooker once it cools down. Serve hot with rotis. Enjoy!☺️

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A Big Feather in A Blogger’s Cap

Wow! 101 followers, 8645 views, 5560 visitors since 2015…Amazing statistics, as far as I am concerned.

Thanks, WordPress and my Dear Readers for your love and blessings!!!

I got this notification a few days back, but I was too caught up in other things and realized its importance only today…

Well, better late than never. It’s time to celebrate.

Hurray, It’s Working!

When innovations work in a developing country like India, it feels like a great miracle indeed!

A few days ago, I read in the newspaper that the Delhi metro card can now be used to pay DTC bus fares too.

So, last week, with much trepidation, I gave my Metro card to the conductor for a Rs.5 ticket to go to Janakpuri West, which was just one stop away.

He said, “Let me try.”

As I had expected, his ticket vending didn’t work. He didn’t have any change either and I was just about to reach my stand. A frantic search in my purse, however, yielded a Rs.5 coin and I managed to drop off with a ticket in my hand.

A few days later, on 21 November 2018, however, I was luckier. Though the machine took some extra time and I had a Rs.5 coin ready, the bus conductor asked me to wait. He was determined to make the machine work. I was absolutely delighted when a ticket came out of it just in time. See the pic on top.

When I said, “Thank you, Bhaiya,” he responded with a triumphant smile and a thumbs up gesture!

The following day, however, I was in a different DTC bus on my way to the same stop. This time, the conductor said, “The machine is not updated yet for metro cards.”

Well, each day is different, isn’t it? Everything can’t be perfect.

Remembering Mom – Part II

Beant Kaur

(18 Nov. 1939 – 16 Nov. 2017)

These 2 pics are of Mom in around 1978 in Nigeria as Lady Health Sister.

On 16 November 2018, after completion of prayers, my Dad, sister and I walked quietly out of the C-Block, Vikaspuri Gurdwara.

It was one of those solemn occasions which throws you into a peculiar mood. You are neither happy nor sad.

We couldn’t be sad because in death exactly a year ago, my Mom got a permanent relief from a worn-out, ailing body.

We couldn’t be happy either because it reminded us once again of an irreplaceable vacuum in our lives, of the loss of a brave, constantly inspiring soul.

This Gurdwara too has a special significance for us because Mom gave so much of herself to it.

Our home-warming prayer rituals after we moved from Nigeria to our own house in Vikaspuri in 1984 were performed through this Gurudwara. It was a dream come true for Mom in particular as she had struggled so much all through life, beginning from the childhood trauma of partition in 1947 and subsequent arrival in Delhi as a refugee.

Later on, after Mom quit her regular job in around 2000, she spent her last few years of active duty in this Gurdwara as their Medical Services Coordinator. She always believed that the best way to worship God is through service to humanity.

And then finally, when Mom expired, all her death rituals were completed by Bhaijis of this Gurdwara.

Here are some pics of the Gurdwara and the Medical Center.

Well, life must go on…Living must go on living and dead souls have to be at peace in their new homes.

Mom, rest in peace and continue to shower your blessings on us…

Ghughni Simplified…

After days of feasting, it feels good to return to the joys of simple eating…No oil, no green chillies, no green coriander, no tomatoes, no ginger…

Ingredients: Boiled chickpeas, lemon juice, onions, whole jeera and dhania powder, chilli powder and salt as per taste.

Process: Mix all ingredients with spices, salt and lemon juice as per taste.

See photo above. Enjoy…

Cream & Strawberry Crackers

Last night, after dinner, I had a sudden craving for something sweet. We had some sweets lying in the fridge, but I wanted to eat something different. I had neither the time nor the energy for any more cooking and something had to be done, I thought. That was when an idea came to my mind.

I rushed to the kitchen and created a plate of cream and strawberry crackers. See the photo above. I was amazed to find that it took me just 3 minutes!

Given below are the steps of this 1-2-3-go recipe.

1. Bring out Frozen cream (Cream from milk kept in freezer for making desi ghee)

2. Take out strawberry sauce and Brittannia Marie biscuits or any other tasteless biscuits you have at home.

3. Rub cream on the biscuits and then pour strawberry sauce over each biscuit. Sprinkle some sugar on the biscuits.

Your cream-strawberry crackers are ready. Enjoy!

I wondered why I didn’t do this earlier. Well, necessity is the mother of invention, isn’t it?

I recently shared this recipe on a Facebook group Mad Food addicts. They were all floored by its sheer simplicity. Someone out there mentioned that it reminded him of his childhood experiments in cooking and suggested that I also experiment with Horlicks or Bournvita paste.

A Peaceful Procession

Main Akela hi chala tha janib-e-manzil Magar log saath aate gaye aur karwaan banta gaya…These are famous lines in Urdu by Majrooh Sultanpuri…Meaning: I began walking alone towards my destination, but people kept joining in and a procession formed.

On the cool, balmy morning of 4 November 2018 (Sunday), while I was on my way to work, I came across this procession of South Indian Christians. I was intrigued because Christians in Delhi are a generally quiet, reserved lot. They never flaunt their identity so openly, unlike so many other communities.

They looked quite cute, I must say. Some of them were dressed in traditional attire. But the best part was that they didn’t have loudspeakers. They carried red flags, umbrellas, and little candles in paper glasses. Some of them sang hymns from their prayer books.

See more photos below.

A red car with their banner on its front side and Marigold garlands all over it moved slowly ahead of everyone…

Sometimes I wonder why some religions like this one proudly bear the label ‘Orthodox.’ A religion is, after all, supposed to be liberating, all-inclusive, tolerant of differences of opinion while the word ‘Orthodox’ implies rigidity, inflexibility, and intolerance of divergent ideas…

Anyway, may God bless these people and I hope the day brings them great joy and happiness while walking together peacefully with the name of the Lord on their lips.