Tag Archives: chutney

Green Peanut Chutney

Today, on 15 September 2019, I made my own version of a green chutney with roasted peanuts. It was for the first time that I used roasted peanuts in a chutney and it tasted absolutely heavenly! My family loved it. Its taste was similar to that of a coconut chutney.

Before going for work, my husband Sukhangshu asked me to keep some for him for dinner. I took that as a big complement.

I wondered why I didn’t try it out earlier. It’s so simple and easy to make, far easier than coconut chutney which I make very often. Coconut chutney requires almost 10 times more effort and time. You first need to crack a coconut and keep aside its water. Then you need to extract the edible part from its shell after hitting it several times from diferent angles. Next, you have to grate the coconut. I have often injured my fingers while doing all these activities. Those days are gone now.

Here is the recipe.

Ingredients: Green coriander 50 g, curry leaves 1 tablespoon, 6 green chillies, one onion, raw peanuts half cup, amchur one teaspoon.

Method: Roast peanuts on medium flame and keep stirring to avoid burning for about a minute or two till the outer covering starts cracking and coming off. Switch off the gas and allow peanuts to cool down. Then rub them between your fingers till the outer coating comes off from all the nuts. Blow air from your mouth into the plate of peanuts and you will see that the brown flakes will all fly off.

In a mixie, add all the ingredients (peanuts, green chillies, coriander leaves, curry leaves, onion, and salt (as per taste) with about a cup of water. Grind them all into a paste. Your green chutney is ready.

Enjoy!!!

Next time, I will use roasted chana in place of peanuts and see what the chutney tastes like.

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Sandwich Art

Here are the step-by-step pics.

Prepare Pomegranate Chutney: Blend a cup of pomegranate seeds with 2 green chillies, some gur, and amchur. Add some water if required. This is what you will get.

Cut sandwich into 4 pieces. Garnish with chopped carrots.

Sweet-Sour Jamun Chutney

 

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Last week, my husband brought home a big packet of jamuns (Indian Blackberry). They were quite good, but we couldn’t eat them all because jamuns have a tangy taste and tend to cause a sore throat. I didn’t want to let them sit in the fridge and rot away since jamuns have lots of health benefits. So I decided to make a chutney with it. It was the first time I made a chutney out of jamuns and it turned out to be quite tasty.

Here are the step-by-step pics.

  1. Wash the jamuns in a sieve.
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2. Peel them with a knife and remove the seeds.

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3. Add green coriander and mint (dhania and pudina leaves) after washing them properly.

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4. Add green chillies & gur.

 

 

5. Put all these ingredients into a mixie. Add salt according to taste. Add some water and grind into a paste. You will get a sweet-sour chutney just like what you see on the top….

Gavar Paratha

 

Last Sunday, during my weekly stock-taking in my kitchen, I noticed that my fridge contained a 4-day-old cooked Gavar Phali (Cluster Beans) dish. We had already had it several times already and none of my family members wanted to eat it any more. Gavar is not a very popular vegetable anyway. But I hate to waste food items, so I had to find a way out and turn it to into something else that could be eaten with great relish.

Another item sitting idle was pudina (mint). I  had bought fresh pudina 3 days ago for making chutney. But the mixie conked out at the last minute, leaving me with a bowlful of pudina that couldn’t be stored in the fridge for too long. Its leaves turn black very soon. So I dried the leaves in the microwave oven. I used a little bit of this in a few dishes, but a lot of it was still remaining…

I decided to apply my Mom’s style of cooking that day and combined both of these items with atta, onions and spices. I kneaded the whole stuff into a dough and made parathas with it. They were delicious and all the items were over in a jiffy. Here are the pics…

  1. Mix atta (mixed grain preferable), cooked gavar vegetable (you can use boiled gavar also), chopped onions, dried pudina (you can use fresh pudina also), and spices (ajwain, salt, etc). I added only salt and ajwain, since my cooked gavar was already well-spiced.
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2. While kneading the dough, remove the gavar threads that you come across, since they might upset your stomach. This bowl that you see here contained the cooked gavar earlier, as you must have guessed from the oil and spices sticking to it. The idea of writing this post came to me only after the gavar and pudina had got mashed inside the dough…

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3. Take out rolls of dough.

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4. Roll each of these balls on a chakla like this.

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5. Shallow fry the paratha on a tawa and remove it after it turns brown on all sides.

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6. Serve the parathas with a chutney/dip of your choice.

Culinary Gods

If you ever happen to be walking on a dusty street of Delhi, just stop for a moment and look around you. You will most certainly find a couple of culinary heroes. They are generally migrants who have come from far-flung towns and villages in UP, Bihar, Haryana, Darjeeling, Nepal, Mizoram, etc. From morning till night, they cook, toil, and sweat, and sell their stuff to the locals with the hope of earning enough money for themselves and their folks back home. Their grit, courage, and determination are really admirable and that’s what makes them little Gods in their own right.  The items they sell may not qualify for Michelin’s 5-star status, but they carry that special touch and feel of the land they have originated from. This is what makes Delhi a melting pot of so many cultures and cuisines.

Let me tell you about 2 such people.

Raju: You will find him at Uttam Nagar Bus Terminal, near Uttam Nagar East Metro Station. He has come from Uttar Pradesh. From morning till night, he fries cocktail samosas in a little karahi and sells them to the passersby. His price is Rs.10 for 4 samosas, that is, Rs.2.50 per piece, which is damn cheap if you compare it with a standard samosa in Delhi which costs Rs.10 per piece. His low pricing is his way of fighting competition.

A few days ago, it was raining when I passed by his shop. I usually avoid street food, but I just couldn’t resist the temptation and I bought these samosas. I was pleasantly surprised to find them very tasty and the spices were very balanced too. During the rainy season, he puts up a tent and carries on because sales are much more when it rains. Considering the amount of plastic that goes inside a packet of Kurkure of the same price (Rs.10), these samosas are, I think, far safer and more nutritious. Try them whenever you are passing through this place and you feel like eating something crunchy and spicy.

Tashi Sherpa: Tashi works for a living at Mini Market, AG-1 Vikaspuri. He has come from Darjeeling and lives in Uttam Nagar at present. He began his business in Vikaspuri about a year ago. His daily routine begins here at 4 PM.

His most significant contribution to this locality has been the introduction of ‘Buglet,’ a recipe which he has brought from Darjeeling, and 2 new varieties of samosa, chowmein samosa and macaroni samosa.

Samosas with fillings other than potatoes were earlier associated with places like Moti Nagar and Paharganj. Thanks to Tashi, we get them now in AG-1, Vikaspuri too! He is doing quite well here, he says with his characteristic smile, especially with his buglets and samosas.

Buglet is a kind of roll made from maida stuffed with chicken or vegetables depending on the preferences of the customers. The roll is fried in a karahi and sliced into two before serving.

Here are the photographs.

Raju @ Uttam Nagar Bus Terminal

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Tashi Sherpa, AG-1, Vikaspuri

 

Buglets being deep-fried…

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Before serving/packing, each Buglet is sliced into 2 pieces.

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Tashi, busy with his customers…

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Here are a few more heroes and Gods. These pics were all clicked near Uttam Nagar Red Light…

Seller of luscious and colorful fruits

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Guptaji’s Faluda Kulfi…

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Pawan Tikki Burger

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Selling Shikanji (drink made with lemon juice, water, sugar, ice, and spices)

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Juice stall…

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